A Dozen Doors

A few months ago, a good friend of ours, Danielle, gave us an art project to complete – photograph a dozen doors from around the world and post them on our blog. After taking pictures of hundreds of interesting and unique doors, Matthew and I selected the dozen that we think captures aspects of each country.

Thanks to Danielle for this awesome art project!

Fortification in Ronda, Spain

Fortification in Ronda, Spain

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Local Residence in Chefchaouen, Morocco

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Local Residence in Fes, Morocco

Mausoleum of Moulay Ismail in Meknes, Morocco

Mausoleum of Moulay Ismail in Meknes, Morocco

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Local Residence in Marrakech, Morocco

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King’s Palace in Marrakech, Morocco

Karnak Temple - Egypt

Karnak Temple – Egypt

Preah Khan Temple in Siem Reap, Cambodia

Preah Khan Temple in Siem Reap, Cambodia

Ta Prohm Temple - Siem Reap, Cambodia

Ta Prohm Temple – Siem Reap, Cambodia

King's Palace, Phnom Phen, Cambodia

King’s Palace, Phnom Phen, Cambodia

Citidel Interior in Hue, Vietnam

Citidel Interior in Hue, Vietnam

Citidel Gates in Hue, Vietnam

Citidel Gates in Hue, Vietnam

Unexpected Letters

Over the past month, my brother, Matthew, and I have had an art project to observe the world around us and record objects that may appear as letters.  Some letters were harder to find than others, but we think we were able to capture the entire alphabet!  Thanks to Danielle for giving us this project!

Letter A

Letter A

Letter B

Letter C

Letter C

Letter D

Letter D

Letter E

Letter E

Letter F

Letter F

Letter G

Letter G

Letter H

Letter H

Letter I

Letter I

Letter J

Letter J

Letter K

Letter K

Letter L

Letter L

Letter M

Letter M

Letter N

Letter N

Letter O

Letter O

Letter P

Letter P

Letter Q

Letter Q

Letter R

Letter R

Letter S

Letter S

Letter T

Letter T

Letter U

Letter U

Letter V

Letter V

Letter W

Letter W

Letter X

Letter X

Letter Y

Letter Y

Letter Z

Letter Z

 

The Louvre

Ceiling

Le Gallarie d’Apollon

Philippe II Auguste created the Louvre more then 800 years ago. It was originally built as a castle along with a wall that encircled all of Paris, as a defense mechanism. Therefore the castle was used as a prison and an arsenal for Philippe II and other French monarchs until 1364.

In 1364 Charles V turned the Louvre into a royal residences, and after his accession to the throne, the Louvre became his royal palace. The Louvre continued to be the royal residences until Francois I. He was fond of art and collected many Italian paintings and sculptures, which he wanted to display in the Louvre. The Louvre continued to be a major residence for French Kings, until Louis XIV created and moved his court to Versailles.

Law Code

Code of Hammurabi

The Louvre was next used by French revolutionaries to house royal families, majorly in 1791. It was also used to store all the revolutionaries’ scientific and artistic treasures. Two years later, the Louvre became the Central Art Museum. In 1981 any remaining government offices were moved, and the Louvre became a museum completely dedicated to art.

 

 

Venus de Milo

Venus de Milo

Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa

Today, the Louvre is considered one of the biggest museums in the world, and stores many priceless pieces of art:  the Venus de Milo, the Mona Lisa, Victoire de Samothrace, the Law Code of Hammurabi and many others. To see every installation in the Louvre for about 1 minute, would take approximately 9 months. According to the museum, over 10 million people visit the Louvre each year. I feel very lucky to have had the chance to see some of the Louvre’s masterpieces.

Victoire

Victoire de Smothrace